Companies are not studying the long-term health impacts of repeated exposures to the chemical mixtures typically found in cosmetics – in other words, they have no idea about the real health risks of these products.

Companies are not studying the long-term health impacts of repeated exposures to the chemical mixtures typically found in cosmetics – in other words, they have no idea about the real health risks of these products.

TOXIC INGREDIENTS IN BABY PRODUCTS AND COSMETICS

The Story of Stuff Carcinogens in baby shampoo? It''s true! Dozens of children''s bath products analyzed at an independent laboratory in 2009 were found to contain formaldehyde and 1,4 dioxane, two chemicals that cause cancer in lab animals and are classified as probable human carcinogens. Popular brands containing these chemicals include Johnson''s Baby Shampoo, Sesame Street Bubble Bath and Huggies Naturally Refreshing Cucumber & Green Tea Baby Wash. The companies argue that each product contains just low levels of these toxins – but there shouldn''t be any carcinogens in baby shampoo at all. Period.

What''s pinkwashing?

Pinkwashing is a term used to describe the activities of companies and groups that position themselves as leaders in the struggle to eradicate breast cancer (often labeling products with the iconic pink ribbon) while engaging in practices that may be contributing to rising rates of the disease. Not cool!

Despite their reputation as champions for women''s health—burnished by their highprofile breast cancer charity events—Estee Lauder, Revlon and Avon could all be called pinkwashers! Indeed, all three companies continue to use chemicals linked to cancer and other chemicals linked to harm. These "pink-ribbon leaders" manufacture dozens of products each that rank an 8 or higher on the Skin Deep database''s toxicity scale (10 is the worst)—including products that contain carcinogens and hormone-disrupting chemicals linked to increased cancer risk.

For more about the not-so-cute history of the pink ribbon (which was co-opted by a beauty magazine) and Breast Cancer Awareness Month (which was started by a pharmaceutical/chemical company), see Chapter 6 of the book "Not Just a Pretty Face: The Ugly Side of the Beauty Industry" by Stacy Malkan. www.notjustaprettyface.org

Article Source